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Supplemental Security Income Archives

How is my income factored in with SSI benefits?

For New Jersey residents who are seeking Supplemental Security Income through Social Security disability, the word income has several meanings. The person who is receiving SSI might be getting income from other sources. There are rules as to what counts when calculating the SSI benefits and what is considered income. This is key when seeking and receiving SSI benefits.

What are the income limits to receive SSI benefits?

A person who lives in New Jersey and is blind, disabled or age 65 or older and has low income and limited resources can apply for Supplemental Security Income. There are certain rules that the person must follow. Included in those rules is a limit on their income. Before applying, the person must understand how much they can earn. If they earn too much, they might be ineligible.

If I attend school and work, are my SSI benefits affected?

New Jersey residents who are receiving Supplemental Security Income will obviously meet the income requirements and have a qualifying disability. For those who are under age 22, however, they might want to attend school and work despite their illness, condition or injury. A problem that might arise is that the amount of money they earn could be considered too much to continue qualifying for SSI benefits. Fortunately, there is the Student Earned Income Exclusion.

What should I know about a redetermination of my SSI benefits?

Getting approved for Supplemental Security Income through the Social Security disability program might give New Jersey residents some piece of mind, but they must be aware of certain rules and requirements to continue receiving SSI. For example, the Social Security Administration will review various aspects of the recipient's life to make certain that the payment amount is accurate. These aspects include income, resources and living arrangements. For a person who is married or is a disabled child under age 18 who still resides with their parents, the spouse or parents will also have the above factors reviewed.

What is the prerelease procedure for SSI benefits?

For New Jersey residents who are seeking Supplemental Security Income, there are a seemingly endless number of rules and requirements for them to receive an approval. In truth, it is not that complex if the person has legal assistance and understands the rules. For those who meet the income and disability requirements to get SSI benefits, there are other factors that must be taken into consideration. One is if the person is in an institution and is anticipating a release. There are steps to take to get the SSI benefits quicker than they otherwise would. This is what is known as the prerelease procedure.

Can living arrangements have an influence on my SSI benefits?

Since Supplemental Security Income is a Social Security Disability program that is meant to benefit people who meet certain requirements based on income and other factors, there are numerous ancillary issues that can affect the benefits and how much is received. New Jersey residents who are seeking or already receiving SSI benefits should be aware of them. One issue is living arrangements.

How do resources affect getting SSI benefits?

Disabled individuals in New Jersey who meet the income requirements for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) under the Social Security Disability program are also required to meet certain requirements when it comes to resources they have available to them. Owning resources that go beyond a certain value can prevent the person from receiving SSI-related benefits. This is important to understand when applying for SSI benefits.

What are the requirements for Supplemental Security Income?

There are two programs offered by the Social Security Administration to help victims of injuries or illnesses in the United States who are unable to work - the Social Security Disability Insurance program, or SSDI and the Supplemental Security Income program, or SSI. While the Social Security Disability Insurance programs is paid for and handles victims who paid into the program through payroll taxes, Supplemental Security Income is geared towards Americans who did not pay into the SSDI program, are unable to work and who meet minimum income thresholds.