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Supplemental Security Income Archives

If I got SSI benefits as a child, what happens when I turn 18?

Supplemental Security Income is a program that provides benefits to people who are disabled, blind or 65 and older and meet certain requirements for income and resources. It is also available to children who meet the criteria to get benefits. What New Jersey residents who receive SSI benefits as children should be aware of is that there will be a redetermination when they turn 18. This does not automatically mean that the person cannot get SSI benefits any longer when turning 18.

What are the rules for reporting wages when I get SSI benefits?

New Jersians whose financial and disability circumstances meet the requirements to receive Supplemental Security Income should know that the Social Security Administration must receive information to ensure that the SSI benefits are warranted. That means it is necessary for a person getting SSI and SSI-related benefits must report their income to the SSA. This is important because SSI is based on need for those who are disabled, blind or 65 and older. It hinges on the income that the recipient has available. If that income surpasses a certain amount, they will no longer be able to get SSI.

With SSI benefits, what is PASS and what are its elements?

People in New Jersey who meet the requirements to receive Supplemental Security Income because they are blind, disabled or age 65 or older might want to try and get back to work or start a business of their own. A concern they will often express centers around how it affects their SSI benefits if they do so. With a plan to achieve self-support, it is possible to get SSI and work. Understanding PASS and the elements of the program is essential before moving forward with it.

Understanding how children are eligible for SSI benefits

New Jersey residents who have a child who is blind or disabled will undoubtedly understand the difficulties with the situation. It is not easy to care for a child who is suffering from disabilities. Fortunately, these children might be able to get Supplemental Security Income. For people who are considering applying for SSI benefits, it is imperative to understand how the Social Security Administration defines a child, how the program works, and what the criteria is. Another important aspect is deeming, which was covered in a previous post.

Protecting SSI benefits when trying to get back to work

New Jersey residents who meet the requirements to get Supplemental Security Income benefits will frequently have the ability and the desire to try and get back into the workforce. A sticking point that can prevent them from following through on that desire is the fear that they will lose their SSI benefits and either not be able to get them again or need to wait a long time to get them. The Social Security Administration accounts for this by providing certain work incentives for people receiving SSI.

What changes to SSI benefits should I be aware of for 2018?

New Jersey residents who are seeking Supplemental Security Income or are already receiving SSI benefits should know that the Social Security Administration will generally alter the amount that the recipient receives on an annual basis. Since 2018 has just begun, it is important to know the amounts that people in various situations will receive once they are approved for SSI benefits. It is also imperative that people know how their benefits might change if they have been approved and are already receiving benefits.

How do financial institution accounts affect my SSI benefits?

New Jersey residents who are eligible to receive Supplemental Security Income must follow certain requirements to retain them. The basics are relatively easy to remember, such as the person must be blind, be age 65 or older, or be disabled, and must have an income below a certain level and have limited resources. However, those who have resources should be aware of how this can affect their SSI-related benefits. That includes money in financial institutions. The Social Security Administration will look at the account and use it to determine if it will influence the person's eligibility to receive SSI.

What is deeming with SSI benefits for children?

New Jersey parents who have a child who is disabled will often have questions about Supplemental Security Income. Understanding how parental income and resources are deemed when the decision is made whether the child can get SSI-related benefits is key. A disabled child under age 18 who has working parents might still be able to get SSI benefits. The Social Security Administration will assess the parental income and resources before making its decision. This is a foundational aspect of the SSA's decision.

How is my income factored in with SSI benefits?

For New Jersey residents who are seeking Supplemental Security Income through Social Security disability, the word income has several meanings. The person who is receiving SSI might be getting income from other sources. There are rules as to what counts when calculating the SSI benefits and what is considered income. This is key when seeking and receiving SSI benefits.

What are the income limits to receive SSI benefits?

A person who lives in New Jersey and is blind, disabled or age 65 or older and has low income and limited resources can apply for Supplemental Security Income. There are certain rules that the person must follow. Included in those rules is a limit on their income. Before applying, the person must understand how much they can earn. If they earn too much, they might be ineligible.