Can your family members receive SSDI?

| Feb 8, 2021 | Social Security Disability

If you’ve suffered from a qualifying disability in New Jersey, you might be eligible for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). SSDI is a government program that supplements your income while you’re unable to work. Your family members can also apply for benefits while you’re receiving SSDI.

Who’s eligible for SSDI?

Once you’ve started collecting Social Security Disability Insurance, your family members can apply for SSDI to supplement their own income and cover the costs of raising a child. Spouses, minor children and disabled adult children are eligible for SSDI benefits attached to your record. If you’re divorced, even your former spouse can apply for SSDI.

To apply, your family members will need to provide personal information like their birth certificates, marriage licenses and Social Security numbers. If they qualify, the government might issue an amount that equals up to 50% of your benefits. For example, if you’re earning $500 a month on SSDI, your spouse might be eligible for their own $250 monthly payment. This is a completely separate payment that doesn’t affect your benefits at all.

Anyone who qualifies can apply for SSDI, but there’s a limit to how much money your family can earn in a month. On average, your family members cannot earn more than 150% of your total benefits. If they do, the government might reduce their payouts. A SSDI attorney could help you and your family members apply for SSDI and get the most possible benefits.

Do you need an attorney when applying for SSDI?

Every day, the government rejects people who qualify for SSDI simply because they made a mistake during the filing process. An attorney could help you make sure that you file everything correctly the first time and get your SSDI benefits as soon as possible.